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Typelevel Summit Copenhagen

June 3, 2017 at Comwell Conference Center Copenhagen, Denmark

About the Summit

The fourth Typelevel Summit will be co-located with the Scala conference: Scala Days!

The Summits are open to all, not just current contributors to and users of the Typelevel projects, and we are especially keen to encourage participation from people who are new to them. Whilst many of the Typelevel projects use somewhat “advanced” Scala, they are a lot more approachable than many people think, and a major part of Typelevel’s mission is to make the ideas they embody much more widely accessible. If you’re interested in types and pure functional programming we’d love to see you here!

This is a community conference and we strive to make it an inclusive and fulfilling event for all participants. All attendees, speakers, and organizers must abide by the Typelevel Code of Conduct.

Speakers and Schedule

Time Talk
8:30
Registration
9:00
Opening Remarks
9:05
Keynote: Inviting everyone to the party
  • Andrea Magnorsky

Most of today's popular general-purpose programming languages incorporate various aspects of the imperative, object and functional programming paradigms. In some cases, these languages provide clear guidelines as to what style is preferred, and wh...

More
10:05
Break
10:30
Refined types for validated configurations
  • Viktor Lövgren

Are you tired of writing boilerplate code to load configurations? Have you ever had errors because of bad configuration values? Then this talk is for you! In a live-coding session we’ll see how to encode validation rules on the type-level and load...

More
11:10
Herding types with Scala macros
  • Marina Sigaeva

In Scala we use the term “type safety”, but what it really means? In short, most applications model data types in a form suitable for storage, change, transmission, and use. During the life cycle of the data, we expect to always use the declared t...

More
11:25
Break
11:45
Monad Stacks or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Free Monad
  • Harry Laoulakos

In this talk, I will demonstrate various techniques, such as: Monad Transformers, Effects libraries, and Free monads. These techniques can be used to transform scala “spaghetti” code (that is embedded maps, flatmaps and pattern matching) to cleane...

More
12:25
Freestyle: A framework for purely functional FP Apps & Libs
  • Raúl Raja Martínez

Freestyle is a newcomer friendly library encouraging pure FP apps & libs in Scala on top of free monads. In this talk we will discuss design choices and main features including modules, algebras, interpreter composition and what is being planned f...

More
12:45
Lunch Break
14:00
Lenses for the masses – introducing Goggles
  • Ken Scambler

Lenses, or more generally optics, are a technique that is indispensable to modern functional programming. However, implementations have veered between two extremes: incredible abstractive power with a steep learning curve; and limited domain-speci...

More
14:40
The power of type classes in big data ETL: a real world use case of combining Spark and Shapeless
  • Zhenhao Li

In this talk, we will explore a type driven approach of big data ETL in Spark. Through code snippets, we will see how to express data processing logic with type classes and singleton types using Shapeless, and how to build a higher level DSL over ...

More
14:55
Break
15:15
Mastering Typeclass Induction
  • Aaron Levin

Typeclasses are a powerful feature of the Scala. Using typeclasses to perform type-level induction is a mysterious, yet surprisingly simple, technique used in shapeless, cats, and circe to do generic programming. We will use basic data types to wa...

More
15:55
Do it with (free?) arrows!
  • Julien Richard-Foy

DSLs with a monad-based algebra (such as free monads) are becoming popular. Recently, DSLs with an applicative-based algebra (e.g. free applicatives) also aroused interest. It is not new that there exists another notion of computation that sits in...

More
16:25
Break
16:45
Libra: Reaching for the stars with dependent types
  • Zainab Ali

When we code, we code in numerics - doubles, floats and ints. Those numerics always represent real world quantities. Each problem domain has it’s own kinds of quantities, with its own dimensions. Adding quantities of different dimensions is nonsen...

More
17:30
Reception hosted by 47 Degrees

Keynote: Inviting everyone to the party

at 9:05

Most of today's popular general-purpose programming languages incorporate various aspects of the imperative, object and functional programming paradigms. In some cases, these languages provide clear guidelines as to what style is preferred, and why. As programmers, we have a choice to make about which paradigm(s) to use and to what extent, even if the language provides clear guidelines. How should we think about those choices? Where are the sweet spots to make trade-offs, and what do they depend on? Let's wear the hats of history and science, thinking about the past and looking to the future, examining these apparent conflicts. Paradigm change is not a new thing - perhaps we can learn something from the history books? Wear Some(hat) and party like it's a hat party. With hats.

About Speaker

  • Andrea Magnorsky

TBD

Refined types for validated configurations

at 10:30

Are you tired of writing boilerplate code to load configurations? Have you ever had errors because of bad configuration values? Then this talk is for you! In a live-coding session we’ll see how to encode validation rules on the type-level and load validated settings without any boilerplate code.

In the first part of this talk we’ll look at the challenges associated with loading configurations. We’ll see how typesafe config is typically used, and see how we can eliminate most boilerplate code with Typelevel incubator project PureConfig. We’ll however see that it’s still very much possible to load invalid settings.

In the second part we’ll continue by exploring options to encode type invariants, for enforcing validation, looking at how we can get PureConfig to only load validated settings. We’ll ultimately end up with type-level predicates using Typelevel project refined, and see how we can get PureConfig and refined to work together seamlessly.

The end result is more precise types, with static validation guarantees, and a way of loading validated configurations without boilerplate – finally you can stop worrying about your configurations!

About Speaker

  • Viktor Lövgren

Viktor is a Software engineer at Ovo Energy in London, working on the platform powering energy meter readings and consumption data. He’s an advocate of strongly typed functional programming, and Scala in particular, which has been his professional focus the past three years.

Herding types with Scala macros

at 11:10

In Scala we use the term “type safety”, but what it really means? In short, most applications model data types in a form suitable for storage, change, transmission, and use. During the life cycle of the data, we expect to always use the declared type. But reality is a bit more complicated. One of the main practical problems with the use of types occurs when our application interacts with outside world – in requests to external services, different databases or simply with getting data from file. In most cases, an attempt to support type safety leads to writing a lot of code that we always try to avoid. Fortunately we have macros to do all routine job for us! In this talk we will discuss how to use compile-time reflection in library for schemaless key-value database and the benefits of use of macros in production systems.

About Speaker

  • Marina Sigaeva

I'm a physicist. And I'm in love with fashion, ballet and beauty.

Monad Stacks or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Free Monad

at 11:45

In this talk, I will demonstrate various techniques, such as: Monad Transformers, Effects libraries, and Free monads. These techniques can be used to transform scala “spaghetti” code (that is embedded maps, flatmaps and pattern matching) to cleaner code that almost looks like imperative code.

About Speaker

  • Harry Laoulakos

Functional programmer, enjoying programming in Scala, Play framework, Akka, Typelevel stack: cats, shapeless, etc

Freestyle: A framework for purely functional FP Apps & Libs

at 12:25

Freestyle is a newcomer friendly library encouraging pure FP apps & libs in Scala on top of free monads. In this talk we will discuss design choices and main features including modules, algebras, interpreter composition and what is being planned for future releases.

About Speaker

  • Raúl Raja Martínez

Raul Raja is a functional programming enthusiast, CTO and Co-founder at 47 Degrees, a functional programming consultancy specialized in Scala.

Lenses for the masses – introducing Goggles

at 14:00

Lenses, or more generally optics, are a technique that is indispensable to modern functional programming. However, implementations have veered between two extremes: incredible abstractive power with a steep learning curve; and limited domain-specific uses that can be picked up in minutes. Why can't we have our cake and eat it too? Goggles is a new Scala macro built over the powerful & popular Monocle optics library. It uses Scala's macros and scandalously flexible syntax to create a compiler-checked mini-language to concisely construct, compose and apply optics, with a gentle, familiar interface, and extravagantly informative compiler errors. In this talk I'll introduce the motivation for lenses and why usability is a problem that so badly needs solving, and how the Goggles library, with Monocle, helps address this in an important way. There'll be some juicy discussion of Scala macro sorcery too!

About Speaker

  • Ken Scambler

I'm an FP enthusiast based in Melbourne, Australia, with 15-odd years of programming under the belt, including 7 of Scala. I help out with the YOW Lambda Jam and Compose :: Melbourne FP conferences, and the Melbourne Scala User Group. I work at REA Group, where I was one of the hands hoisting the Scala flag 4 years ago, Iwo Jima-style. My job is mostly to prevent people from writing more software.

The power of type classes in big data ETL: a real world use case of combining Spark and Shapeless

at 14:40

In this talk, we will explore a type driven approach of big data ETL in Spark. Through code snippets, we will see how to express data processing logic with type classes and singleton types using Shapeless, and how to build a higher level DSL over Spark to make the logic easy to read from the code.

About Speaker

  • Zhenhao Li

Zhenhao Li is a data engineer and data scientist at Connecterra, a data science and IoT startup. He is responsible for making scalable data processing jobs and pipelines and making sure data science insights are generated and delivered in real time. Before joining Connecterra, Zhenhao worked for Accenture in the area of big data and IoT technology consulting, helping major clients to adapt new technologies such as Kafka and Flink, the immutable data paradigm, and functional programming to gain business value faster. He holds a bachelor degree in software engineering and a master degree in logic. He was doing a PhD in mathematical logic at the University of Amsterdam when decided to change his career path to big data and data science. He loves functional programming, and Scala is his primary language for engineering work.

Mastering Typeclass Induction

at 15:15

Typeclasses are a powerful feature of the Scala. Using typeclasses to perform type-level induction is a mysterious, yet surprisingly simple, technique used in shapeless, cats, and circe to do generic programming. We will use basic data types to walk you through how this is done and why it’s useful.

About Speaker

  • Aaron Levin

Aaron Levin is a mathematician who fell in love with programming and now manages Data Science teams at SoundCloud.

Do it with (free?) arrows!

at 15:55

DSLs with a monad-based algebra (such as free monads) are becoming popular. Recently, DSLs with an applicative-based algebra (e.g. free applicatives) also aroused interest. It is not new that there exists another notion of computation that sits in between applicative functors and monads: arrows. The goal of this talk is to revisit the relationship between these notions of computation in the context of DSL algebras. Through examples of DSLs based on real world use cases, I will highlight the differences in expressive power between these three notions of computation (and some of their friends) and present the consequences for both interpreters and DSL users. At the end of the talk, you will have a better intuition of what it means that “arrows are more powerful than applicative functors but yet support more interpreters than monads”. You will get a precise understanding of “how much” expressive power you give to your users according to your DSL algebra, and, conversely, “how much” you reduce at the same time the space of the possible DSL interpreters. Finally, you will note that arrows provide an interesting trade off. Notably, they support sequencing, they can be invertible, and their computation graph can be statically analyzed.

About Speaker

  • Julien Richard-Foy

Julien Richard-Foy likes writing programs. In particular, he likes leveraging programming language features to solve engineering problems. He is fascinated by languages that make it easy to turn ideas into programs that are executable by machines and easy to reason about by humans. He writes tools and MOOCs for the good of the community, at Scala Center.

Libra: Reaching for the stars with dependent types

at 16:45

When we code, we code in numerics - doubles, floats and ints. Those numerics always represent real world quantities. Each problem domain has it’s own kinds of quantities, with its own dimensions. Adding quantities of different dimensions is nonsensical, and can have disastrous consequences. In this talk, we’ll tackle the field of dimensional analysis. We’ll explore dependent types, singleton types, and dive into generic programming along the way. We’ll find that dimensional analysis can be brought much closer to home - in the compilation stage itself! And finally, we’ll end up deriving Libra - a library which brings dimensional analysis to the compile stage for any problem domain.

About Speaker

  • Zainab Ali

Zainab is a functional programmer who converted from object oriented design. A physicist at heart, she was excited to find an application of dimensional analysis and dependent types to real world problems. She is the author of Libra and a contributor to many typelevel libraries, such as cats and fs2.

Sponsors

We’d like to thank all our sponsors who help to make the Summit happen:

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Underscore Lightbend

Silver Sponsors

47 Degrees Soundcloud Signify scalac